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News Release
Release No. STELPRD4021659
ContactKelly Clark775-887-1222 x130
Printable Version  Printable Version
(JULY 2, 2013) USDA RURAL DEVELOPMENT HELPS ELKO WOMAN PURCHASE OWN HOME

Carson City, NV, Jul 11, 2013 -- USDA Rural Development Helps Elko Woman Purchase Own Home

Maria Murillo, the Housing Loan Specialist with USDA Rural Development, knew when she met Iva Macias that she was a force to reckon with. The single mom from Elko was determined to provide a stable home for her child after years of sharing rentals.

It was December 2012 when they first met. Macias, 29, had come to the USDA Rural Development office in Elko seeking a low interest home loan. Murillo had just joined the agency as the region’s Housing Specialist after years at the local Farm Service Agency. She learned that Macias had worked in hair salons for over 11 years, and had been working as manager at an Elko hair salon

.

Iva had worked on clearing past debts, and had earned a good credit rating. She and her 7-year-old daughter were living in a rental in Spring Creek, where Macias sublet a room. Due to Elko’s housing shortage, she was sharing the house with other roommates, and she wanted a stable home for her daughter.

“She had a good employment history and I could tell that she wanted to better herself, “Murillo said. “She had been working about a year and a half for the beauty salon where she was manager, and a year before that at the mine.”

Murillo explained that a solid employment history is one thing that USDA RD looks for in a future homebuyer. “I need to see continuous employment for two years; it could be at different jobs, but it has to be continuous,” she said.

“I could also see that even though she had a few past credit issues, she had worked diligently to take care of her debt, which is always important.”

Iva says she knew that her past debt problems would have been a problem with a basic home loan. “I knew I would be paying high interest, I would have to come up with a large down payment; with USDA they helped me and guided me on how to fix my credit, I feel like I am sitting in a really good place now because of that.”

Murillo was happy to help Macias learn about how to apply for a USDA home loan, and even more pleased that she is now a homeowner.

“She was very cautious, and was aware of what she could afford. She had worked hard to resolve some problems, and stuck with it, even though it took some time. I know she will succeed and that makes me feel good,” Murillo said.

Macias is a second generation Nevadan, with lots of family in the region. She has nothing but good to say about homeownership.

“I love it. I know everyone says it is a lot of work, but at least the hard work and sweat goes into something that is your own, not for someone else.”

And to carry on the tradition, her little girl has her own playhouse in the backyard. “She loves it too, now she has her own play house in the back yard, and she is getting the chance to fix it up and paint it for herself. That means a lot to me.”

For more information on the USDA Rural Development Home Loan Program, visit the Elko Office at the Farm Service Center on Silver Street, or call Maria Murillo at (775) 738-8468 Ext. 4. Or visit us on line at www.rurdev.usda.gov/NVHome.html

USDA has made a concerted effort to deliver results for the American people, even as USDA implements sequestration – the across-the-board budget reductions mandated under terms of the Budget Control Act. USDA has already undertaken historic efforts since 2009 to save more than

$828 million in taxpayer funds through targeted, common-sense budget reductions. These reductions have put USDA in a better position to carry out its mission, while implementing sequester budget reductions in a fair manner that causes as little disruption as possible

Last Modified:09/19/2013 
 
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